~BLACK HISTORY~ KILL THE VIOLENCE NOT OUR OWN!!! "EMMETT TILL"July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955

History is history..no matter what the situation is good or bad.The reason I share this is because its people like Emmett Tills family who had to suffer losing a loved one to violence.This situation also led to the beginning of the fight for our right to have an opinion..and walk in these states and do all things we have been able to indulge in these past years.One of the most important is being able to praise God.And this past weekend (if some didnt hear),there was a shooting in a church in Richmond California.A city where I, like most east bay area people are really familiar with.Violence is everywhere but this is just showing we are getting closer and closer to something that will change us and this world forever.So maybe this reminder of Emmett and his family will put a buzz in the next persons ear to pass on to a youngster that is on the verge..Who knows!! Im just here to share it...and its basically like this*

In August 1955, a 14–year–old black boy from Chicago named Emmett Till had recently arrived in Money, Mississippi to visit relatives. While in a grocery store, he allegedly whistled and made a flirtatious remark to the white woman behind the counter, violating the strict racial codes of the Jim Crow South. Three days later, two white men—the woman’s husband, Roy Bryant, and his half–brother, J.W. Milam—dragged Till from his great uncle’s house in the middle of the night. After beating the boy, they shot him to death and threw his body in the Tallahatchie River. The two men confessed to kidnapping Till but were acquitted of murder charges by an all–white, all–male jury after barely an hour of deliberations. Never brought to justice, Bryant and Milam later shared vivid details of how they killed Till with a journalist for Look magazine, which published their confessions under the headline —The Shocking Story of Approved Killing in Mississippi.”

Till’s mother held an open–casket funeral for her son in Chicago, hoping to bring public attention to the brutal murder. Thousands of mourners attended, and Jet magazine published a photo of the corpse. International outrage over the crime and the verdict helped fuel the civil rights movement: just three months after Emmett Till’s body was found, and a month after a Mississippi grand jury refused to indict Milam and Bryant on kidnapping charges, a city–wide bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama would begin the movement in earnest.

Views: 13

Comment

You need to be a member of Spicey Promotions to add comments!

Join Spicey Promotions

Comment by NoTTy RaS on February 16, 2010 at 11:57am

SIGN-UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

Signup for our Mailing List

* required

First name:
Last name:
Email *:
City:
Gender:
Male
Female

Members

LIKE US

© 2019   Created by Spicey Promotions.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service