BLACK FACTS..WE COME SO FAR "THE INTERGRATION OF CENTRAL HIGH" "LITTLE ROCK'S NINE"

We have come so far for our freedom of education,of speech,of simply eating where we want.And I think if a lot more of the youth knew about the fights and struggles,it may give them some more sense of care and morals for life.I dont just mean the struggles and bad either.Show them the good powerful facts as well.I think even we adults sometimes forget what our ancestors have done to allow us so many more oppurtunities.So this is a reminder of what the Little Rock Nine had to go through ..JUST TO GO TO SCHOOL AND LEARN"

Although the Supreme Court declared segregation of public schools illegal in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the decision was extremely difficult to enforce, as 11 southern states enacted resolutions interfering with, nullifying or protesting school desegregation. In Arkansas, Governor Orval Faubus made resistance to desegregation a central part of his successful 1956 reelection campaign. The following September, after a federal court ordered the desegregation of Central High School, located in the state capital of Little Rock, Faubus called out the Arkansas National Guard to prevent nine African–American students from entering the school. He was later forced to call off the guard, and in the tense standoff that followed, TV cameras captured footage of white mobs converging on the —Little Rock Nine” outside the high school. For millions of viewers throughout the country, the unforgettable images provided a vivid contrast between the angry forces of white supremacy and the quiet, dignified resistance of the African–American students.

After an appeal by the local congressman and mayor of Little Rock to stop the violence, President Dwight D. Eisenhower federalized the state’s National Guard and sent 1,000 members of the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne division to enforce the integration of Central High School. The nine black students entered the school under heavily armed guard, marking the first time since Reconstruction that federal troops had provided protection for black Americans against racial violence. Not done fighting, Faubus closed all of Little Rock’s high schools in the fall of 1958 rather than permit integration. A federal court struck down this act, and four of the nine students returned, under police protection, after the schools were reopened in 1959. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Be6RYJT1NCg

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